Welcome to the brand new McLaren GT. It comes in as the storied British marque’s new grand tourer, sharing its DNA with the glorious Speedtail hypercar. If you’re after an everyday supercar that can carry your golf clubs, this is the car for you.

The McLaren GT looks pretty similar to other late-model McLarens, featuring a traditional pointed nose, forward-set cabin, and long tail. You might notice the front and rear overhangs sprout further outward than most of McLaren’s vehicles, however, the company says its 10-degree approach angle (or 13 degrees with the nose raised) provides enough clearance for most speed bumps.

From the side profile it looks its most elegant, but from the rear it blows you away with its wide stance, accentuated by muscular haunches, huge exhaust pipes, and fully integrated rear wing. Around at the front is the signature hammerhead line that spreads beneath the LED headlights.

So, what’s the engine, you ask? Behind the cabin is a 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 that generates 456kW (620PS) and 630Nm. Although this isn’t an epic amount of power typically associated with McLaren’s super-special models, it does give you some idea of its grand touring focus.

The McLaren GT weighs 1530kg, which, again, isn’t all that impressive. But that also gives you some idea of its intended purpose; this car is designed to provide comfort as well as insane speed. Speaking of which, 0-100km/h comes up in just 3.2 seconds, with 0-200km/h completed in 9.0 seconds. These figures mean it certainly ain’t hanging around. It also has a top speed of 326km/h.

To ensure the GT handles like a dream McLaren has fit its renowned hydraulic dampers with Proactive Damping Control. It’s all compiled together with lightweight aluminium double wishbones, and managed by the most sophisticated version yet of McLaren’s Optimal Control Theory software, similar to that on the 720S. Drivers can choose between Comfort, Sport, and Track modes.

McLaren really is pitching the GT as a grand tourer, and has decked out the cabin in some surprisingly practical and luxurious appointments. For the tunes there’s an optional 12-speaker Bowers & Wilkins sound system complete with carbon fibre sub-bass woofers and Kelvar mid-range units.

For the driver, vital info is displayed on a 12.3-inch TFT digital instrument cluster, with graphics described as being similar to what’s seen on aircraft. To enhance the style and class, many switches and controls are made from machine and knurled aluminium, while the seats are wrapped in Nappa leather or optional Alcantara, with an optional SuperFabric trim for the rear luggage area.

As for the luggage, you’ll be able to pack plenty into this bad boy. McLaren promises a total storage volume of 570L, which is a lot for a supercar. It’s enough room for a set of golf sticks, bags, or skis, according to McLaren. The overall volume is made up of a traditional rear compartment measuring 420L, and a front compartment measuring 150L.

The new model slides into the showroom somewhere between the Sports, Super and Ultimate Series models. It is designed to capture a new audience for the brand, and to provide buyers with an alternative to the existing rivals on the market. Orders are being taken now, with deliveries set to commence towards the end of this year. Prices start from £163,000 in the UK. Australian prices are yet to be confirmed.

Maverick
I like to think that I'm a car fanatic, but more of a driving fanatic. There's nothing better than getting out onto the open road, almost regardless of the car, and enjoying dancing with the controls and gathering up the moving scenery. If I'm not driving I'm either at the gym or sinking a few beers with friends.




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